Sensory Input - Visual Attention, Perception, and Memory Age Norms

Names a removed object when shown several familiar objects for a few seconds:

  • 3.0 - show 3 objects, remove 1 object, and ask the child which one is missing
  • 4.6 - show 4 objects, remove 1 object, and ask the child which one is missing

Tells whether 2 simple pictures are:

  • 3.9 - the same or different

Avoids danger:

  • 3.0 - walks slowly on wet, icy, or slippery surfaces
  • 3.6 - demonstrates caution by avoiding hot stoves, knives, heights, electric outlets, deep water, broken glass, etc.

Recognizes simple repeating patterns:

  • 3.9 - matches a sequence or pattern of 3 to 6 shapes/beads
  • 4.6 - continues a pattern of shapes/beads in a sequence

Names or points to the missing part:

  • 4.3 - of a simple picture, such as a missing wheel on a car or a missing leg on a horse

Recalls:

  • 4.6 - any 4 objects seen in a simple picture shown to the child for 4 seconds

Hearing Attention, Perception, and Memory Age Norms

Imitates several animal sounds:

  • 2.3 - arf, meow, moo, oink, baa, neigh

Repeats sentences accurately:

  • 2.3 - 3 syllables: "Toys are fun."
  • 2.6 - 4 syllables: "I want that ball"
  • 3.0 - 5-6 syllables: "I am a big boy/girl now."
  • 3.6 - 7-8 syllables: "I like peanut butter cookies."
  • 4.6 - 10 syllables: "The black, furry cat ran through the backyard"

Identifies at least 3 objects by:

  • 2.9 - the sounds they make.

Follows related requests in correct order:

  • 2.9 - 2-step commands
  • 3.6 - 3-step commands

Repeats sequences of numbers:

  • 2.9 - 2 digits: 4-7
  • 3.6 - 3 digits: 3-8-5
  • 4.0 - 4 digits: 2-7-6-10
  • 5.0 - 5 digits: 3-1-8-6-9

Follows unrelated requests in correct order:

  • 3.6 - 2-step commands
  • 4.6 - 3-step ;commands

Understands complex directions:

  • 4.3 - Examples of directions:
    "Point to the tall boy who is not running."
    "Point to the small dog with brown ears and spots."

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